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Developers Going Big In Surging Town

Developers going big in surging town

It’s a trend in Texas’ fastest-growing county: growing pains. The population of Dripping Springs, a bedroom community west of Austin in Hays County, boomed over 175 percent in the last six years to nearly 7,500 people, census figures show. Now it needs to upgrade roads and wastewater treatment. And it doesn’t have enough restaurants or middle-priced housing for all the newcomers.   Read more from Annie Blanks with San Antonio Express-New here.

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Developer Aims To Create ‘legacy’ Music Venue With Massive 20,000-seat Amphitheater In Southwest Austin

Developer aims to create ‘legacy’ music venue with massive 20,000-seat amphitheater in Southwest Austin

Developers hope to add a crown jewel to the Austin area's already bustling live music scene: a 20,000-seat amphitheater at the center of a 71-acre entertainment and residential project near Bee Cave. International Development Management Co. aims to open the first pieces of the Violet Crown project in 2023, with the amphitheater targeted to open by Labor Day 2023. Plans also call for two luxury apartment towers, a distillery and tasting room, a Top Golf-style driving range and a parking…

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Freshwater Mussels In Guadalupe River Could Go On Endangered List Because Waters They Live In Have Changed

Freshwater mussels in Guadalupe River could go on endangered list because waters they live in have changed

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed placing six Texas freshwater mussels on the endangered species list and designating nearly 2,000 miles of Texas rivers as critical habitat for them. The Guadalupe River Basin — one of four river basins highlighted by the proposal — is home to three of the mussels: the Guadalupe fatmucket, the false spike and the Guadalupe orb. As bottom feeders, freshwater mussels are vital to the Texas Hill Country’s ecology and food chain.  …

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Accolades Pour In For Comal County Conservationist Jensie Madden, Who Died Sept. 24 In Fischer

Accolades pour in for Comal county conservationist Jensie Madden, who died Sept. 24 in Fischer

Longtime Fischer resident and San Antonio native Jensie Simms Madden, 74, a “founding sister” of the Comal County Conservation Alliance whose fierce advocacy extended to many other prominent environmental organizations in Comal County, died unexpectedly on Sept. 24 alongside husband Daniel Robert Madden, 75. The Maddens passed away in the straw-bale stucco home they built for themselves after retiring to Fischer in 2001. No cause of death has been reported.   To hear more about Jensie's impact in our community…

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Loss Of A Fish Affirms Fears About Growth

Loss of a fish affirms fears about growth

A tiny, rare fish found only in a small section of the San Marcos River has gone the way of the dodo. The extinction of the San Marcos gambusia affirms the fears of scientists and environmentalists that mounting development and rapid population growth in Hays County threaten the survival of endangered species as well as the region’s water supply.   Read more from Annie Blanks with the San Antonio Express-News here.

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City Approves Incentive Package For Spurs Training Center And Research Campus At La Cantera

City approves incentive package for Spurs training center and research campus at La Cantera

The San Antonio City Council approved an agreement with the San Antonio Spurs organization Thursday to contribute up to $17 million in tax rebates for a proposed new development and practice facility on the far Northwest Side. The Chapter 380 Economic Development Grant Agreement with Spurs, Sports & Entertainment (SS&E) includes a 20-year, 60% tax rebate and a five-year recapture period to support construction of a total $510 million Human Performance Research Center (HPRC) and other public and commercial spaces.…

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Greenway System Is A Jewel, Fund It In Bond

Greenway system is a jewel, fund it in bond

The Howard W. Peak Greenway system is a jewel, connecting San Antonians to nature in the heart of our city. Bike, walk or run on these 82 miles of developed trails and you will encounter deer, foxes, the occasional ambling armadillo, and an array of butterflies and birds. To travel on San Antonio’s greenways is to bask in the shade of a live oak in the summer or feel the first crisp breeze of November.   Read more from the…

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1,400-acre Development Near Hamilton Pool Ignites Push To Protect Salamander

1,400-acre development near Hamilton Pool ignites push to protect salamander

Austin's Save Our Springs Alliance and a group of environmental scientists have filed a petition with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to list the Pedernales River springs salamander as "endangered" or "threatened" under the federal Endangered Species Act. The action is a direct response to the planned 1,400-acre Mirasol Springs development along Hamilton Pool Road and the Pedernales River that encompasses the amphibious species' already ­delicate habitat near Dripping Springs' Hamilton Pool Preserve.   Read more from Lina Fisher…

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Residents Struggle To Coexist With Quarries

Residents struggle to coexist with quarries

Growing up in the Texas Hill Country, Mark Friesenhahn often would run barefoot through the countryside with his younger brother — but only if their father, “a 150-pound, mean little banty rooster German, full of the culture and work ethic,” hadn’t assigned them a task on the family farm. Occasionally, the boys would hear a siren warning of an imminent blast at the Servtex Quarry Plant 3 miles away.   Read more from Brian Chasnoff with the San Antonio Express-News…

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Opinion: Unconscionable If Lawmakers Were To Ignore Water Infrastructure

Opinion: Unconscionable if lawmakers were to ignore water infrastructure

Less than a year ago, at the end of a particularly vicious peak in the pandemic, half of Texas was without drinking water. Some neighborhoods went dry for weeks. COVID-19 in the aftermath of Winter Storm Uri was a public health emergency that should never be repeated. Yet this week, despite billions of federal funds available to fix the problem, the Texas Legislature could decide to turn a blind eye to the most essential of all health systems — our…

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