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Watershed Association Purchases 74 Acres Of Dry Cypress For Recharge Protection

Watershed Association Purchases 74 acres of Dry Cypress for Recharge Protection

The Wimberley Valley Watershed Association (WVWA) finalized the purchase of 74 acres adjacent to the Colemans Canyon Preserve on Wednesday, November 10, 2021.  This purchase secures critical recharge area for the Middle Trinity Aquifer and is within the catchment area for Jacob’s Well.   Read more from the Wimberley Valley Watershed Association here.

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Out Of Excuses; Secure Hill Country’s Fragile Water

Out of excuses; Secure Hill Country’s fragile water

Here’s something we don’t get to say very often: It’s been a promising month for water in the Hill Country. With record sprawl pushing ever westward from I-35 and climate change threatening an age of Texan megadroughts, the water future of the Hill Country has looked increasingly fragile. Yet this month’s passage of a bipartisan infrastructure package with $55 billion directed toward the water sector — combined with the development of major new water reuse planning resources directed specifically at…

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The Renewed Environmental Justice Movement Is Bringing In Millions For Texas Southern University

The renewed environmental justice movement is bringing in millions for Texas Southern University

Forty years ago, there was no clear blueprint for environmental justice. While digging into the injustices that wreaked havoc on Houston’s communities of color, Texas Southern University scholar Robert Bullard became the pioneer. Now, widely regarded as “the father of environmental justice,” Bullard, 74, has seen the movement evolve into a force to be reckoned with.   Read more from Brittany Britto with the Houston Chronicle here.

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Southwest States Facing Tough Choices About Water As Colorado River Diminishes

Southwest states facing tough choices about water as Colorado River diminishes

This past week, California declared a statewide drought emergency. It follows the first-ever federal shortage declaration on the Colorado River, triggering cuts to water supplies in the Southwest. The Colorado is the lifeblood of the region. It waters some of the country's fastest-growing cities, nourishes some of our most fertile fields and powers $1.4 trillion in annual economic activity. The river runs more than 1,400 miles, from headwaters in the Rockies to its delta in northern Mexico where it ends…

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The Infrastructure Bill Has Passed. What Now?

The infrastructure bill has passed. What now?

We highly recommend this nuanced take on recent federal infrastructure funding outlined in the article below from Small Towns. While having additional federal infrastructure funding is crucial to the continued success of our changing communities, we also recognize that with big money comes big challenges. - Hill Country Alliance So, the behemoth of an infrastructure bill finally passed over the weekend. And there was much rejoicing… Well, not from us. At Strong Towns, we’ve been skeptical of the current bill…

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Water Seed Grant Initiative Webinar Summarizes Project Progress

Water Seed Grant Initiative webinar summarizes project progress

In 2020, seven multidisciplinary teams were chosen as recipients of the fiscal year 2020-2021 Water Seed Grant Initiative, “Research, Engineering and Extension: Creation and Deployment of Water-Use Efficient Technology Platforms.” The teams were selected by Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station (TEES). Through the initiative, the three Texas A&M University System agencies have provided $1,136,627 in funding for the grants for 20 months across fiscal years 2020 and 2021, administered by Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI).  …

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White House To Review Floodplain Building Codes In Response To Petition

White House to review floodplain building codes in response to petition

The White House on Tuesday announced a series of new proposals for climate initiatives, including new building standards for structures in flood-vulnerable areas. In the fact sheet, the Biden administration announced a comment period for an update to the National Flood Insurance Program’s (NFIP) standards for floodplains. The last major update to the standards took place in 1976.   Read more from Zack Budryk with The Hill here.

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EPA Announces The Expected Availability Of $21.7 Million In Grant Funding To Support Rural And Small Water Systems

EPA announces the expected availability of $21.7 million in grant funding to support rural and small water systems

Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that it expects to issue by October 15th a $21.7 million grant funding opportunity for technical assistance and training providers to support small drinking water and wastewater systems that are often located in rural communities across the United States. EPA’s funding will improve public health and environmental protection by helping ensure that drinking water in these communities is safe and that wastewater is treated and responsibly returned to the environment.   Read…

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If You Think The Texas Electrical Grid Is Fragile, Take A Look At Our Water Infrastructure

If you think the Texas electrical grid is fragile, take a look at our water infrastructure

In August, during the second special session of the 87th Texas Legislature, the Texas Capitol flooded. After the water stopped cascading down the pink granite walls inside the Capitol extension, the Legislature resumed its deliberations. The August flood was preceded by February’s severe winter storm. Hundreds of Texans died in the cold and dark after days without power and, in some places, without water.   Read more from Todd H. Votteler on the Dallas Morning News here.

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Already, 18 Weather Disasters Costing At Least $1 Billion Each Have Hit The U.S. This Year

Already, 18 weather disasters costing at least $1 billion each have hit the U.S. this year

This year is on pace to be one of the most active and costliest years for disasters in the United States. Through the first nine months of 2021, the U.S. has endured 18 separate weather and climate disasters that have cost at least $1 billion, according to the latest report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Centers for Environmental Information. Read more from Kerrin Jeromin with the Washington Post here.

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