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This Water Is My Water

This water is my water

An old fight over water is coming to a boil in Central Texas, a fight with all the conflict and character of an old western movie. There are farmers up in arms and big-city charmers, empire builders and nervous politicians. The very life of the prettiest river in Texas is in jeopardy, and numerous endangered species are at risk. So, some say, is progress.   Read more from this archived Texas Monthly article written by Al Reinert for the November…

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Water Worries In Texas, Worldwide As Weather Extremes Multiply

Water worries in Texas, worldwide as weather extremes multiply

Water worries are a central element of growing concerns about climate change, which sometimes contributes to meteorological situations with far too much rain and sometimes to others with way too little. Either way, both flooding and drought/heat wave conditions, along with other extremes like brutally cold weather, can tax water utilities and heighten the difficulties for those that manage their crucial infrastructure.   Read more from Bill Dawson with Texas Climate News here.

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Fahrenheit 140 – Texas Climate Predictions And Potty Training Cows

Fahrenheit 140 – Texas Climate Predictions and Potty Training Cows

What weather extremes can Texans expect to see into 2036? How can we prepare for the intensifying natural disasters that Texas is experiencing? Hosts Robert Mace and Carrie Thompson talk with Texas State Climatologist Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon to get the answers to these questions and discuss findings from his latest report on future climate trends in Texas.   Listen to the second episode of Fahrenheit 140 here.

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Southwest States Facing Tough Choices About Water As Colorado River Diminishes

Southwest states facing tough choices about water as Colorado River diminishes

This past week, California declared a statewide drought emergency. It follows the first-ever federal shortage declaration on the Colorado River, triggering cuts to water supplies in the Southwest. The Colorado is the lifeblood of the region. It waters some of the country's fastest-growing cities, nourishes some of our most fertile fields and powers $1.4 trillion in annual economic activity. The river runs more than 1,400 miles, from headwaters in the Rockies to its delta in northern Mexico where it ends…

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Water Seed Grant Initiative Webinar Summarizes Project Progress

Water Seed Grant Initiative webinar summarizes project progress

In 2020, seven multidisciplinary teams were chosen as recipients of the fiscal year 2020-2021 Water Seed Grant Initiative, “Research, Engineering and Extension: Creation and Deployment of Water-Use Efficient Technology Platforms.” The teams were selected by Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station (TEES). Through the initiative, the three Texas A&M University System agencies have provided $1,136,627 in funding for the grants for 20 months across fiscal years 2020 and 2021, administered by Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI).  …

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Already, 18 Weather Disasters Costing At Least $1 Billion Each Have Hit The U.S. This Year

Already, 18 weather disasters costing at least $1 billion each have hit the U.S. this year

This year is on pace to be one of the most active and costliest years for disasters in the United States. Through the first nine months of 2021, the U.S. has endured 18 separate weather and climate disasters that have cost at least $1 billion, according to the latest report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Centers for Environmental Information. Read more from Kerrin Jeromin with the Washington Post here.

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Climate Change Is Making Texas Hotter, Threatening Public Health, Water Supply And The State’s Infrastructure

Climate change is making Texas hotter, threatening public health, water supply and the state’s infrastructure

Climate change has made the Texas heat worse, with less relief as nighttime temperatures warm, a report from the state’s climatologist published Thursday found. Climate data also show that the state is experiencing extreme rainfall — especially in eastern Texas — bigger storm surges as seas rise along the Gulf Coast and more flooding from hurricanes strengthened by a warming ocean, the report says. Those trends are expected to accelerate in the next 15 years, according to the report, which…

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Water Reuse Is Helping Meet Needs. But We Can Do Better.

Water reuse is helping meet needs. But we can do better.

With the state’s population soaring, water resources limited and the climate getting warmer, water reuse is a growing but still underutilized solution to ensure that Texas has clean, abundant water supplies long into the future. The state’s latest water plan projects that direct non-potable water reuse could yield as much as 180,000 acre-feet of water – enough to fill nearly 90,000 Olympic-sized pools – every year by 2030. Austin’s 100-year water plan estimates that nearly a third of the city’s future water supplies could be achieved with water reuse.   Read more from Sharlene Leurig and Jennifer Walker with the Austin…

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Colorado River Forecasts Not A ‘crystal Ball’

Colorado River forecasts not a ‘crystal ball’

Every month the Bureau of Reclamation attempts to peer two years into the future of the Colorado River and its reservoirs. Reclamation’s 24-month study is a staple forecasting product for the federal agency that manages a chain of dams in the watershed, including those that control lakes Mead and Powell, the country’s largest reservoirs — and currently two of its most consequential. The reservoirs are a key source of drinking water for about 40 million people, plus they store water…

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40 Million People Rely On The Colorado River. It’s Drying Up Fast.

40 million people rely on the Colorado River. It’s drying up fast.

On a 110-degree day several years ago, surrounded by piles of sand and rock in the desert outside Las Vegas, I stepped into a yellow cage large enough to fit three standing adults and was lowered 600 feet through a black hole into the ground. There, at the bottom, amid pooling water and dripping rock, was an enormous machine driving a cone-shaped drill bit into the earth. The machine was carving a cavernous, three-mile tunnel beneath the bottom of the…

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