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Talk+water: Kyle Garmany

talk+water: Kyle Garmany

Texas+Water Editor-in-Chief Dr. Todd Votteler interviews Kyle Garmany, Water and Agriculture Program Director for the Texas chapter of the Nature Conservancy. In his role at the Nature Conservancy, Garmany is responsible for developing innovative strategies to alleviate water scarcity and protect the ecological integrity of the rivers, bays, and estuaries of the state. His work includes the development of partnerships with agricultural producers to decrease water use and the execution of environmental water transactions to meet instream and environmental flow…

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Wild Rice Sues To Stop Oil Pipeline

Wild rice sues to stop oil pipeline

In 2018, the White Earth Band of Ojibwe and the 1855 Treaty Authority, an organization that upholds treaty rights for Chippewa bands, enacted legal personhood for manoomin -- wild rice. Manoomin, which translates to “good berry” in Ojibwe, is a sacred food for Chippewa, Ojibwe and Anishinaabe people and has been a part of traditional teachings, stories and way of life since time immemorial.   Read more from Jessica Douglas with High Country News here.

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Urban Riparian Demonstration Site In Seguin Approved For Three More Years

Urban Riparian demonstration site in Seguin approved for three more years

For the past three years, the Urban Riparian and Stream Restoration Program has been conducting research at a demonstration site along Geronimo Creek located within the Irma Lewis Seguin Outdoor Learning Center in Seguin, Texas. The project, which is funded by a three-year grant cycle through the Clean Water Act nonpoint source grant from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, has been approved for an additional three years’ funding. The project is a comparison…

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How Discharged Wastewater Is Feeding Massive Hill Country Algae Blooms

How discharged wastewater is feeding massive Hill Country algae blooms

Green mats coat what once were clear, scenic creeks and rivers, the result of algae blooms that are frustrating those who live in the Texas Hill Country. Effluent is wastewater with its pollutants removed, also known as treated wastewater. When effluent is discharged into creeks in the Hill Country, they experience massive algae blooms, specifically a type called Cladophora glomerata, which attaches to creek beds instead of floating on top of the water like the blue-green algae found in Lady…

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Conservationists Are Plucking The Plants That Threaten Texas Wild Rice, Fountain Darters

Conservationists are plucking the plants that threaten Texas wild rice, fountain darters

Twelve feet below the water in the San Marcos River, conservationists pluck invasive plants from the riverbed. Hydrilla and hygrophila are the victims of this widespread removal. They’re targeted because they threaten two native species that are endangered: Texas wild rice and fountain darters. The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment is on a mission to remove all non-native species and restore the river to what it once was before humans interfered with it.   Read more from Charlotte…

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Healthy Creeks Initiative Underway

Healthy Creeks Initiative Underway

This month, contractors will begin the annual control efforts to manage Arundo along the Pedernales River and several tributary creeks. Arundo, also referred to as Giant Reed or Carrizo Cane, is a non-native, invasive plant that can take over creeks and rivers. Since 2016, the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department (TPWD), Hill Country Alliance (HCA), City of Fredericksburg, and other organizations have partnered with volunteering landowners through the Healthy Creeks Initiative to control Arundo and enhance the creek-side (or riparian)…

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Behold The Splendid And Fragile Beauty Of The Hill Country’s Keystone River

Behold the splendid and fragile beauty of the Hill Country’s keystone river

From April through October, I swim in the Blanco. It is one of the greatest pleasures I know. It’s a pleasure I share with growing crowds of both locals and visitors who converge on the river’s cypress-lined banks at places like Blanco State Park in Blanco; Blue Hole Regional Park on Cypress Creek, a tributary of the Blanco in Wimberley; and Five Mile Dam Park, a 34-acre Hays County park at the lower end of the river near San Marcos.…

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Where There’s A Waterway-there’s A Will

Where there’s a waterway-there’s a will

Gaylord Nelson, the former Wisconsin Governor and founder of Earth Day, had a particularly salient quote that interestingly enough didn’t reference the environment. He said, “The ultimate test of a person's conscience may be the willingness to sacrifice something today for future generations whose words of thanks will not be heard.” That quote singularly epitomizes the heart and soul of the Texas Stream Team, a diverse group of citizen scientists giving of their time and talents to ensure the state’s…

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Accepting & Loving A River

Accepting & loving a river

The Nueces River is vast, even by Texas standards. It starts high up on the Edwards Plateau. Sourced by emerald, spring-fed creeks in Edwards and Real Counties, the Nueces River cuts through the rocky Hill Country before pivoting amidst the South Texas Brush Country, onward toward the coastal prairie; it pauses at Lake Corpus Christi, before it ultimately empties into the Gulf of Mexico at Nueces Bay. Few, if any, know this river better than Sky Lewey. Born in Uvalde,…

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SOS Wins; Judge Reverses Permit That Allowed Dripping Springs To Discharge Into Onion Creek

SOS wins; Judge reverses permit that allowed Dripping Springs to discharge into Onion Creek

Today, Travis County District Court Judge Maya Guerra Gamble struck down a state permit authorizing the City of Dripping Springs to discharge over 800,000 gallons per day of treated sewage into Onion Creek, a prestine water body that is a recharge source for Barton Springs and the Edwards Aquifer. The ruling was made in response to an appeal filed by the Save Our Springs Alliance. After the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) approved Dripping Springs’ requested permit, the SOS…

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