News

Home 5 News ( Page )

Texas’ plan to provide water for a growing population virtually ignores climate change

Texas’ biggest single solution to providing enough water for its soaring population in the coming decades is using more surface water, including about two dozen new large reservoirs. But climate change has made damming rivers a riskier bet. ZAPATA — This small South...

read more

San Antonio’s treated sewage proving vital to river and estuaries

It’s easy to turn up your nose at what you flush down your toilet, but once the city cleans that wastewater, it can benefit the San Antonio River. Treated effluent makes up 90 percent of the flow in the river. It keeps aquatic plants and animals alive. It cools...

read more

New project seeks ‘equitable adaptation’ of urban stormwater infrastructure, management

The National Science Foundation recently announced project awards for its Civic Innovation Challenge (CIVIC) planning grant program, and the team led by Wendy Jepson, Ph.D., Texas Water Resources Institute associate director and University Professor of Geography in...

read more

Opinion: Texas has a long way to go to live up to vision of Clean Water Act

Last month the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) voted to remove what would have been a first-ever microplastics ban from its proposed Surface Water Quality Standards. The decision went against the support of numerous environmental organizations and...

read more

Dried Up: Hydrologists dig into Jacob’s Well, prepare for explosive Hill Country growth

Texas researchers are taking a closer look at the future of the Trinity Aquifer. The aquifer, which provides much of the drinking water to the Texas Hill Country, has seen a sharp decline amid rapid growth and years of extreme drought. The research could help...

read more

Grassroots gathering of Hill Country water advocates reveals ongoing water challenges and opportunities in the region

Hill Country water advocates from across the region gathered in Bandera, TX on October 13th for a day of learning, connecting, and strategizing for water stewardship in our region. “The work to protect our aquifers and rivers is challenging but vital to the long-term...

read more

Looking to re-wild your yard and stray from St. Augustine grass? Native American Seed is here to help!

As we learn more about living mutualistically with nature, we find an increasing number of things in our lives that we need to change. In the 1960s, for example, the world learned about CFCs in hairspray and what those chemicals were doing to our ozone layer. So, in...

read more

Pedernales river springs salamanders may be federally recognized as endangered

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that the Pedernales River springs salamander will undergo status reviews to be put on the federal endangered species list. The Pedernales River springs salamander was discovered in 2019 by researchers at The University of...

read more

In Texas, a new study will determine where extreme weather hazards and environmental justice collide

The way Geeta Persad sees it, the nation’s great coastal cities are facing an environmental reckoning with threats from both the air and the sea. In the air, there is the belching, toxic exhaust from factories, petrochemical facilities, sewage treatment plants and...

read more

Groundwater sampling helps better understand Edwards-Trinity Aquifers

The Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) and scientists from the Barton Springs Edwards Aquifer Conservation District (BSEACD) are studying water deep underground to further understand how drought and pumping affect the quality and quantity of groundwater that flows...

read more

Abandoned “dry hole” oil wells are polluting Texas farms, ranches and groundwater. The state won’t fix them.

Schuyler Wight is a fourth-generation rancher who has raised longhorn cattle outside Midland for decades. Wight is no geologist, but over the years, he’s had to familiarize himself with what lies underground. Scattered across his sprawling 20,000-acre ranch are more...

read more

Sadly, “A Day Without Water” is becoming all to common for Texans

For many Texans, “a day without water” is not an imagined experience—it’s just another day. Some communities have never had running water. For the rest of us, experiencing days without water has become the rule rather than the exception. The one-two punch of...

read more

Hill Country leaders gather in Dripping Springs for 2022 Hill Country Leadership Summit – Our shared stories: Past, present, and future

On Thursday, September 29th, conservation leaders from across the Texas Hill Country met at The Hall at Jester King Brewery for the Hill Country Alliance’s annual Leadership Summit. The event theme, Our Shared Stories: Past, Present, and Future, brought together more...

read more

With midterms ahead, is water on the ballot?

With midterm elections just around the corner, Texas voters must consider immigration, abortion access and gun violence. But when prompted, many worry about water, too. Eighty-four percent of Texas voters want the Legislature to create a fund to update aging water...

read more

To save water in Texas, these nonprofits are paying farmers to leave it in reservoirs

As Texas faces an increasingly fraught environmental future from climate change, a new approach to conservation is growing. Drought conditions have created a two-pronged problem for Texas aquifers, natural bodies of water that move through porous rock underneath the...

read more

‘The Olympics of astronomy’: Travis County gears up for 2024 solar eclipse

Travis County officials are gearing up for a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity in 2024, as a total solar eclipse is expected to pass over the Central Texas region. A total solar eclipse will pass over the Hill Country region on April 8, 2024, from 1:32-1:41 p.m. The...

read more

Dry riverbeds, dead fish, tapped-out wells: Drought takes toll in Hill Country

Kathleen Tobin Krueger stood on a low cliff last week, looking down on her family’s ranchland. Below her lay an expansive field laden with smooth white rocks, trees with exposed roots growing between them. There should be a full, flowing river here — there usually is...

read more

Drought Stage 3 declared by Blanco-Pedernales Groundwater Conservation District

With at least two months of a hot Texas summer left, the Blanco County water situation is becoming a serious concern. Water levels continue to decline in District Monitor Wells. Some well owners have had to lower pumps. Blanco County rainfall for 2022 is currently...

read more

USDA investing $197 million in partner-driven, locally led conservation

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced it is awarding $197 million for 41 locally led conservation projects through the Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP). RCPP is a partner-driven program that leverages partner resources to advance...

read more

Commentary: Drought, growth and the future of the Hill Country

On Thursday, June 9, the North Llano River stopped flowing. On August 4, the U.S. Drought Monitor showed 80 percent of the Texas Hill Country in exceptional drought. The Pedernales, Guadalupe and Frio Rivers are dry, and many other Texas rivers are heading toward zero...

read more

U.S. spares Western states from Colorado River water cuts – for now

The U.S. government spared seven Western states from mandatory Colorado River water cutbacks for now but warned on Tuesday that drastic conservation was needed to protect dwindling reservoirs from overuse and severe drought exacerbated by climate change. Read more...

read more
[archives limit=10]